• The Final Pharmaka: Apocalypse Pharmaka (Part 9)

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    MG12A high-born burial, found near Stonehenge over a decade ago, revealed the remains of a man who had lived in the area for a few years, but was from Central Europe.

    He had several abscesses in his teeth and a poorly reconstructed knee.

    One entirely reasonable theory is that he made the long, dangerous journey to the Salisbury plain because it was known throughout the world as a holy place, a place of healing.

    (Stonehenge’s function as a semi-official sacred triage centre may go some way to explain why there are unexpectedly fewer burials than you would assume for a holy place. It is not unreasonable to surmise that those for whom the healing didn’t take were carted off to their ancestral lands for more culturally-appropriate funerals. It’s also why your grandmother wasn’t buried in a hospital.)

    As evidence continues to grow that the Stonehenge area was a sacred centre dating back 10,000 years, as further astronomical alignments indicate it was a much larger ceremonial centre than previously thought, the suggestion that the Amesbury Archer arrived seeking wholeness is as good as any.

    But it’s also something we understand intimately. When we lack wholeness, it consumes everything else. When a child or a loved one is gravely ill, you find yourself perfectly willing to bargain anything with the Dark Powers -terrestrial or otherwise- for their salvation.

    Since the beginning of mankind, the pursuit of health has been dangerous and largely unsuccessful. Our Pig/Chimp meatsuits  may not even be from this solar system.  Even if they are, they’re still knives in gunfights.

    There was a brief, postwar period where Asklepios smiled on our planet and we received universal vaccinations devoid of politics, the NHS, improvements to anesthesiology that opened up new surgical vistas, improved access to clean water and a standardisation of safe painkillers and antibiotics.

    However, once medicine corporatised, and government medicalised, mankind’s access to health reverted to its more familiar relationship. It’s expensive, it’s fraught with risk and competing ideologies and it’s not for you. These are the unavoidable politics of the post-apocalypse.

    All those miracles you see on the news; growing ears on mince, eyeballs on sea-slugs, lungs on space broccoli, robo-limbs with laser attachments, alien-queen-fighting mech suits, cancer-fighting nanobots. You don’t really think they’re for the likes of you or anyone else in the Great Unwashed, do you?

    Now that Obamacare has revealed itself to be the absurd insurance grab it always was, you can hopefully see that the priorities of corporate medicine have very little to do with replacing the limbs of veterans fighting in the hydrocarbon empire’s various wars… we can’t even house them, so surely their robo-limbs would rust in their sleep under that rainswept rail bridge?

    Put it this way.

    If you can’t get in your self-driving google car at the private airport and tell it to take you to the replacement limb clinic, then you’re just not going to get one. But then, the Jiajing Emperor would have killed you and taken your lands had you sought an audience with his alchemist. Welcome to Earth. (A lucky escape with the alchemist, incidentally. The emperor died of mercury poisoning.)

    And really, that is the ultimate takeaway from this whole series. In point form, it is:

    • Our health overlords are very, very bad guys. You are not their priority.
    • Much of the last forty years of modern medicine is built on out-and-out lies, designed principally to lighten your wallet.
    • The parts that aren’t lies are often quite wrong, anyway. We passed the border of what materialistic, allopathic medicine can do for us a few counties over.
    • Their options, and thus ours, are running out.

    I know from personal experience that most health care professionals are sincere, dedicated individuals. I also know from personal experience that these same health care professionals will be the first to tell you that our current system is magnificently fucked.

    So this series is in no way an assault on them, any more than Archonology is an assault on the soldiers fighting in our overlords’ wars. We all know which heads to feed to La Veuve.

    As the eldest son of a doctor, as a middle-grandson of a doctor, I appreciate there is a certain amount of ‘dad-killing’ going on with this series, but more than that… there is a huge class component to taking control of your health that is rarely acknowledged. This, despite the fact that repeated studies have shown that middle class kids feel entitled to ask questions of their doctors, request clarification on their thinking, etc… while working class kids subsume their concerns before the authority of the Great White Coat. Working class kids who are more likely to be overweight, more likely to have ADHD or depression and more likely to come from families for which a bad health diagnosis means bankruptcy.

    Like all archonic systems, how little those in power know is hidden behind a thin veneer of authority. Anyone who suggests you or I don’t know what we’re talking about… we need to come down on them like Hitler on the Poles. Because there is a lot of ‘you don’t know what you’re talking about’ going around… and that is precisely my point.

    No one is coming to save you but you.

    The Bad Guys: Redux

    Here is how you do business in the health industry.

    China has accused the British pharmaceutical company GlaxoSmithKline(GSK) of behaving like a criminal godfather, bribing doctors with cash and sexual favours in return for prescribing its drugs.

    Chinese police have detained four senior Chinese executives as part of an investigation that stretches back to 2007 and involves deals worth 3bn yuan (£320m).

    The Chinese investigator leading the inquiry said the head of GSK’s Chinese operations, Mark Reilly, a British national, had left the country on 27 June.

    Gao Feng, the head of China’s fraud unit, said: “We found that bribery is a core part of the activities of the company. To boost their share prices and sales, the company performed illegal actions.” [More.]

    Pharma 2

    Bribing governments to take your merchandise and inflict it on their population is only one part of it. Another part of it is to make it impossible for you to have any recourse when their merchandise ends up killing you or a loved one:

    [I]f the FDA says something is safe, it doesn’t matter if that decision is wrong or the result of lies, fraud or deception on the part of the world’s pharmaceutical companies. And there’s no way to sue the FDA for being wrong and costing millions of unsuspecting Americans their lives. That result leaves 240 million Americans unprotected from an industry responsible for more preventable deaths in the US than any other cause.

    Keep taking those pills, eh? Pills that the same bad guys will spend millions ensuring are freely available, even when they cause the greatest drug-addiction crisis since Hogarth railed against cheap gin in London.

    Bovett knew that law enforcement couldn’t arrest its way out of the meth lab problem. They needed to choke off the cooks’ supply lines.

    Bovett first approached the Legislature about regulating pseudoephedrine in 2000. “The legislative response was to stick me in a room with a dozen pharmaceutical lobbyists to work it out,” he recalls. He suggested putting the drugs behind the counter (without requiring a prescription) to discourage mass buying, but the lobbyists refused. They did eventually agree to a limit on the amount of pseudoephedrine any one person could buy, but the number of meth labs remained high, so in 2003 Bovett tried once again to get pseudoephedrine moved behind the counter. “We got our asses kicked,” he admits.

    Then, in Oklahoma, state trooper Nikky Joe Green came upon a meth lab in the trunk of a car. The cook overpowered Green and shot him with his own gun. The murder, recorded on the patrol car’s camera, galvanized the state’s Legislature into placing pseudoephedrine behind the counter and limiting sales in 2004.

    The pharmaceutical industry fought the bill, saying it was unlikely to curb meth labs. But Oklahoma saw an immediate drop in the number of labs its officers busted, and Oregon followed suit later that year.

    But the meth cooks soon came up with a work-around: They organized groups of people to make the rounds of pharmacies, each buying the maximum amount allowed—a practice known as smurfing. How to stop these sales? Bovett remembered that until 1976, pseudoephedrine had been a prescription drug. He asked lawmakers to return it to that status.

    Pharma companies and big retailers “flooded our Capitol building with lobbyists from out of state,” he says. On the eve of the House vote, with the count too close to call, four legislators went out and bought 22 boxes of Sudafed and Tylenol Cold. They brought their loot back to the Legislature, where Bovett walked lawmakers through the process of turning the medicine into meth with a handful of household products. Without exceeding the legal sales limit, they had all the ingredients needed to make about 180 hits. The bill passed overwhelmingly.

    The Nazis invented meth, by the way. ‘Tank chocolate‘. If you are looking for the actual archon drug, this is it. And when bribery and ‘lobbying’ (the difference being?) don’t work, you can always buy a private motherfuckin’ army.

    It is telling that if this were the veterinary industry, we would all be up in arms, demanding better treatment from the companies tasked with healing Fido. Nevertheless, 70% of Americans are on prescription drugs.

    That’s a whole lotta cabbage.

    Commercially motivated lies

    This is actually a much bigger, and much wider deal than people realise. We will revisit its implications in later posts. But, from a pharmaka perspective, it is crucial to understand this. DO NOT SKIP IT.

    In a recent article, “Evaluation of Very Large Treatment Effects of Medical Interventions,” in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Ioannid1s and his colleagues combed through 85,000 medical interventions collected in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews seeking to uncover highly effective treatments. What they found is that treatments that supposedly produce very large benefits (odds ratio greater than 5) were almost always found initially in small studies and that when they were replicated in larger studies the benefits became relatively modest. In the end only one treatment was found to provide a major benefit, e.g., supplying extracorporeal oxgyen to premature babies with severe respiratory failure. Last year, Nature reported the shocking finding that nine out of 10 preclinical peer-reviewed cancer research studies cannot be replicated.

    Another big problem is the bias toward publishing positive results, while sticking negative results in the file drawer. In an interesting 2010 study published in PLoS One, University of Edinburgh researcher Daniele Fanelli found that as the science under consideration got “softer’ the more positive results were reported. [More.]

    cocaine drops

    So, the privately funded studies used to prove the efficacy of these products, cannot be replicated. CANNOT. BE. REPLICATED.

    To be clear, this may not even be fraud. Something wider is going on with the replicability of scientific experiments right across the board, from geology to astrophysics, even to psi.

    It’s unrelated to this post except where it applies to pharma research, but this is an indication to me that you are creating reality at the fringes of your consciousness. If it turns out that replicability is at its least effective at the smallest scales, this may well indicate the probabilistic nature of our universe ‘bleeding up’ to molecular levels. Which would be in keeping with NeoTheosophy. Something more is afoot, either way, the best course of action remains the same: assume sovereignty over your own health.

    Of course, where there is money, there is fraud. News of which is relentlessly suppressed:

    Those of us concerned about the decaying credibility of Big Science were dismayed to learn that the whistleblower site Science Fraud has been shut down due to a barrage of legal threats against its operator. With billions of dollars in federal science funding hinging on the integrity of academic researchers, and billions more in health care dollars riding on the truthfulness of pharmaceutical research claims, the industry needs more websites like this, not fewer.

    Regular readers of Retraction Watch, a watchdog site run by two medical reporters, got the news along with a story about the blog’s anonymous editor, who has since come forward and identified himself as Professor Paul Brookes, a researcher at the University of Rochester. Operated as a crowdsourced reference site much like Wikipedia, Science Fraud, in its six months of operation, documented egregiously suspicious research results published in over 300 peer reviewed publications. Many were subsequently retracted, including a paper by an author whose lawyer sent Science Fraud a cease and desist letter.

    Given the tens of millions of dollars in misappropriated research funds that financed this small sample of what is surely a larger problem and the cascading pollution of the scientific literature whenever fraudulent publications get cited, it’s a shame that this tip-of-of-the-iceberg effort at cleansing the muck is being shut down rather than expanded.

    We are wrong about our most important health issues

    Counting calories is virtually meaningless, it seems. And yet, that appears to be where the official advice begins and ends.

    Of course, that’s not the impression you will get from the admonishments of public-health agencies and wellness businesses. They are quick to assure us that ‘science says’ obesity is caused by individual choices about food and exercise. As the Mayor of New York, Michael Bloomberg, recently put it, defending his proposed ban on large cups for sugary drinks: ‘If you want to lose weight, don’t eat. This is not medicine, it’s thermodynamics. If you take in more than you use, you store it.’ (Got that? It’s not complicated medicine, it’s simple physics, the most sciencey science of all.)

    Yet the scientists who study the biochemistry of fat and the epidemiologists who track weight trends are not nearly as unanimous as Bloomberg makes out. In fact, many researchers believe that personal gluttony and laziness cannot be the entire explanation for humanity’s global weight gain. Which means, of course, that they think at least some of the official focus on personal conduct is a waste of time and money. As Richard L Atkinson, Emeritus Professor of Medicine and Nutritional Sciences at the University of Wisconsin and editor of the International Journal of Obesity, put it in 2005: ‘The previous belief of many lay people and health professionals that obesity is simply the result of a lack of willpower and an inability to discipline eating habits is no longer defensible.’ [More.]

    Consider this: animals, around the world -not just in labs- are getting fatter for no currently discernible reason. How is my extra glass of wine causing that?

    Check this out, then. Our name may well be legion. Could it be that there has been a global change in gut bacteria, and that it’s not really about those carbs you ate? It’s certainly a better explanation for the rise of animal fatties than that wrap I had for lunch.

    One examined bacteria in nearly 300 Danish participants and found those with more diverse microbiota in their gut showed fewer signs of metabolic syndrome, including obesity and insulin resistance. The other study put 49 overweight participants on a high-fibre diet. Those who began with fewer bacterial species saw an increase in bacterial diversity and an improvement in metabolic indicators. This was not the case for those who already had a diverse microbiome, even when fed the same diet.

    If you think there aren’t spas in China and the Far East currently cultivating feces bacteria to feed to their fat guests, then your understanding of the health and beauty industry is unambitious. People feed their feet to fish. (We may also be looking at causation rather than correlation when it comes to the observation that people who eat natural yoghurt every day are less likely to be overweight. I’ll start there. You start with the feces. Then we’ll compare notes. Science!)

    Of course, we may not be doing ourselves any favours with what you put in your face, bacteria notwithstanding. 80% of pre-packaged American food is banned in other countries.

    Meanwhile, French kids don’t get ADHD:

    The French holistic, psycho-social approach also allows for considering nutritional causes for ADHD-type symptoms—specifically the fact that the behavior of some children is worsened after eating foods with artificial colors, certain preservatives, and/or allergens.

    Literal food for thought, eh?

    funny-ads12

    We are right about our most important mental health issues

    You all remember when we explored how Prozac does nothing, the fact that it does nothing was concealed by the company who made it, and the entire serotonin hypothesis is on its last legs?

    Well, what are they going to prescribe for this?

    A June 2013 Gallup poll revealed that 70% of Americans hate their jobs or have “checked out” of them. Life may or may not suck any more than it did a generation ago, but our belief in “progress” has increased expectations that life should be more satisfying, resulting in mass disappointment. For many of us, society has become increasingly alienating, isolating and insane, and earning a buck means more degrees, compliance, ass-kissing, shit-eating, and inauthenticity. So, we want to rebel. However, many of us feel hopeless about the possibility of either our own escape from societal oppression or that political activism can create societal change. So, many of us, especially young Americans, rebel by what is commonly called mental illness…

    Even within mainstream psychiatry, few continue to argue that the increase in mental illness is due to previous under-diagnosis of mental disorders. The most common explanations for the mental illness epidemic include recent over-diagnosis of psychiatric disorders, diagnoses expansionism, and psychiatry’s pathologizing normal behavior…

    In the last two decades, there have been a slew of books written by journalists and mental health professionals about the lack of science behind the DSM, the over-diagnosis of psychiatric disorders, and the pathologizing of normal behaviors…

    Yet another explanation for the epidemic may also be evolving from radical to mainstream, thanks primarily to the efforts of investigative journalist Robert Whitaker and his book Anatomy of An Epidemic (2010). Whitaker argues that the adverse effects of psychiatric medications are the primary cause of the epidemic. He reports that these drugs, for many patients, cause episodic and moderate emotional and behavioral problems to become severe, chronic and disabling ones.

    Examining the scientific literature that now extends over 50 years, Whitaker discovered that while some psychiatric medications for some people may be effective over the short term, these drugs increase the likelihood that a person will become chronically ill over the long term. Whitaker reports, “The scientific literature shows that many patients treated for a milder problem will worsen in response to a drug—say have a manic episode after taking an antidepressant—and that can lead to a new and more severe diagnosis like bipolar disorder.” [More.]

    I vaguely recall Dr Hyatt suggesting that people with depression should quit their jobs and sail around the world rather than take medication and head back to the cubicles. As someone who has historically suffered from it, there is a case to be made here.

    And yet, people seem so very resistant to this idea. However, what else is life for? Do you think your gravestone will read “he sold a lot of farm equipment”?

    TV-Motorola-Ad

    Fukushima

    You can’t spell Fukushima without ‘fuck you’ kinda! I kid, of course. But, seriously, you probably are fucked.

    1. Many experts are urging people to stop eating sea life from the Pacific. This would obviously include anything from Japan. Marine chemist Ken Buesseler found Pacific cesium levels 50 million times higher than pre disaster levels. (The levels tapered off but plateaued at 10,000 times higher than normal.) The algae get contaminated and it goes to the little fish, to the big fish and then to you.

    2. Dairy and meat. The higher on the food chain, the higher the concentration of radioactive materials may be. Dairy products in particular may be the most contaminated item, because the living creature has eaten the contaminated grass, other foods and water (from contaminated rain that forms from the Pacific and atmospheric particles); the radiation from which is stored it in its body and passed on to whoever eats it. After the Chernobyl disaster there were numerous cases of children becoming severely ill from drinking cow’s milk. [More.]

    We don’t need the myth of chemtrails slowly giving us cancer. (Yes, they’re a thing, but it’s cloudseeding to prop-up our over-farmed agricultural resources.) It would be a needlessly slow, expensive and destructive way for the so-called New World Order to reduce the population.

    Besides, throw in EM pollution from the rise of cellphones and wifi, add a little nuclear meltdown in a high-current area of the world’s largest ocean and the job is done for you anyway. You have cascaded carcinogens right through the biosphere.

    On the surface, this may appear to be a grim note to end the round-up on, but only if you look at it with human eyes. There is nowhere you can go to build an unspoilt, unpolluted, bucolic life of veganism and massage. No one gets out of here alive.

    How’s that sailboat looking now?

    oldtimeadsatt0010114

    ‘Dr’ Gordon ‘prescribes’

    As repeatedly mentioned, Gordon is not a doctor of anything at all, and this does not in any way constitute a prescription.

    Now that that’s out of the way, here are some things we can pull out of the collapsing ontology of health in the post apocalypse.

    1. Meditation

    At this point in time, I will be unsurprised if this is my last word. Nevertheless, you are consciousness. Keep it clean.

    2. Movement

    Whilst high impact exercise is contra-indicated for weight loss, and whilst modern gym culture emerged largely out of that weird Austro-Germanic nationalism of the late nineteenth century that also happened to give us… other things… pick a form of movement you actually like doing and then do it every day.

    You don’t need to be ripped -the gods know I won’t ever be- but if you aren’t mobility-impaired and can’t run for a bus then it’s time to put down the grimoires and pick up the running shoes.

    3. Fasting

    So it turns out that severe caloric restriction CURES Type 2 Diabetes in a matter of weeks. Cures it. If you’re not pregnant, then you might want to investigate what permutation of this genuinely ancient and sacred practice may work for you. And don’t give me that blood sugar bullshit. Anything related to insulin production appears to respond favourably to fasting in various forms. Just leave it on the table as an option.

    Over the course of my life, there will be so very many, many things that I will be completely wrong about. This won’t be one of them.

    4. Avoid sugar

    This could easily be ‘don’t eat crap’ but, as previously discussed, there are class implications there. (Not that that should be your excuse.)

    But look. Keeping your blood sugar low protects your memory into old age. Perhaps because sugar is a highly-addictive poison?

    5. Take back sovereignty of your consciousness

    Beyond meditation, there are… other things. And taking control of them provides across-the-board uplift.

    Video time:

    http://youtu.be/mKgQuEaPnXk

    Link round-up time:

    My point with all of these is that there is a five year gap between promising research results and the weaponisation release to market of patented ‘safe’ medications based on those results. (Not that you can sue if it turns out they’re unsafe.)

    You need to hit the internets and decide where you fit. Which brings me to the last point:

    6. Combine the orthodox with the unorthodox

    When something bad happens to you -and eventually it will- seek orthodox treatment and get your Scooby Gang on when it comes to alternate treatment. This means doing proper research. Google Scholar, libraries, the whole thing. Don’t just read articles about the research.

    There are few legitimate alternatives to surgery to fix a severely broken ankle, for instance. But… just look at the implications of some of these results. Look with your wizard eyes.

    And so we come to the end of the Apocalypse Pharmaka series. (One down!) It got interrupted by -you know- the apocalypse. But now that that’s all over I want to leave you with this.

    The ontology of health is one of the most crucial Theatres of Engagement in the Mind War. Crucial in what it ultimately means to be us, and crucial because your own life quite literally depends on it. Do not cede this theatre to the enemy. Ever.

    I wish you bountiful health and a good journey’s end.

    “There is only one god… and his name is Death. And there is only one thing we say to Death…

    Not today.”

    [Disclaimer: This blog mentions ghosts, wizards, aliens, Atlantis, spells and fortune telling. If you consider any of that to constitute medical advice then you need to have a good, long look at how you are living your life.]

    About

    London-based occultist and pseudo-pseudohistorian. Messes about with sigils. Travels a lot but is otherwise extremely lazy.

    http://runesoup.com

    16 Responses to The Final Pharmaka: Apocalypse Pharmaka (Part 9)

    1. November 12, 2013 at 8:03 pm

      Excellent, excellent post, Gordon.

      My meditation practice has been something honored more in the breach than in the keeping, but this is a great reminder to get back in gear.

      It puts me in mind, too, of Hunter Thompson’s line: “When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.”

      Before this week, I never quite imagined that that would become an aphorism for living, but so it goes. May we all turn pro and come through the storm.
      Stacey Lawless´s last blog post ..“I do not like the way they treat the stuffed animals”

    2. November 12, 2013 at 10:37 pm

      @jeremy Whilst I agree with your premise, obviously… it would be a stretch to call this a pro-alternative-medicine article, surely. There is a world of difference between a tiresome mainstream media piece warning about low-quality herbal supplements and the political reality that what is probably mankind’s best cancer defence has been ignored for three generations because of racist laws. Viewed in the context of the entire series, I hope that’s obvious.

      I’m here to destroy thoughtforms, not replace them. Like a guy who never existed once said:

      “I come not to bring peace, but to bring a sword”. :)

    3. November 12, 2013 at 11:12 pm

      @Stacey That Thompson quote is so very, very on point.

    4. EgnatiusV
      November 13, 2013 at 2:07 am

      Great post. These are issues I’ve been trying to come to terms with since entering the health care field. Previous occupations included mechanical engineering and criminal investigation so I like to question everything but that is not something that was appreciated in school. We were trained to think to a certain point then had to stop (the “thin veneer of authority”?) I came to the same conclusion that we’ve been lied to about health for the past 40 years. My peers think I’m nuts but I’m often the first person they come to when they have a newly diagnosed condition.

    5. November 13, 2013 at 3:06 am

      What kind of meditative and fasting practices do you find most beneficial personally, Gordon? Do you think you’d be interested in doing a post on each subject?

    6. JP
      November 13, 2013 at 4:21 pm

      @Gordon Of course, obvious to most of your readers, I’m sure. However, this is the InTeRnEt, and it’s quite often the case that someone reads a well-written, thoughtful critique like this one and comes away with, “Gur, Big Pharma Bad, Big Supplements Good!” ;)
      JP´s last blog post ..The Black Squirrel’s Conjure 4: How Conjure “Works”

    7. runeworker
      November 13, 2013 at 7:55 pm

      so a friend of mine who is a psychotherapist came back from his week long conference with some books which he has lent me one to read. The book in particular is titled “The Brain Fix”. So far, ti’s been interesting. Mostly in the sense that my diet is actually really great (my mom is a chef, She taught me how to cook, I tend to actually eat more balanced in terms of nutrients and things then most people I know I just tend to eat waaaay to much of it, which is changing now) It is a fascinating read about how diet and lifestyle affects brain health which affects thinking, memory and other abilities.
      some things are like the only caloric nutrient the brain uses is glucose. Protein and most fats are too big to pass the brain blood barrier.
      Omega 3′s seem to be the main impetus behind the development of brain. primitive humans who lived near the ocean and ate mostly seafood developed larger brains faster then landlocked primitive humans, whose diet did not have as much omega 3′. present.
      So far, it’s been a very interesting book.

    8. November 14, 2013 at 2:38 am

      My own experiments in crafting spagyric tinctures have often been tripped up by the lack of quality ingredients, or mislabeled ingredients: American Blue Vervain (Verbena hastata), for example, often winds up packaged and sold as European Vervain, (Verbena officinalis) even though they’re not the same plant. Or the right order of the right plant in bulk herb arrives, but it’s so old as to have no effective value as a medicinal. So even crafting one’s own herbal remedies is fraught with some risks, especially when combined with regular allopathic medicine. The two go together like a horse and horseless carriage, really: complementary technologies that can exist in the same street, but which usually leave the horse gasping for breath and the horseless carriage demanding a deep infrastructure to bring it liquefied dinosaur to feed on.

      Six hundred-odd days into a tai chi daily practice, I can speak to the value of both meditation and movement. Into my forties, and no regular regimen of prescription drugs yet. Haven’t kicked the sugar habit yet, but working on it; same with fasting — occasional successes, no regular practice yet.

      Also, the value of regular, frequent water intake (and extrusion). As a former kidney-stone sufferer, I strongly recommend lots of water. The pain stories are not much exaggerated.
      Andrew Watt´s last blog post ..Tai Chi Y2D243: moving qi

    9. November 14, 2013 at 9:27 pm

      To your health!

      Look up the “cookie diet”, and you may find that conventional medicine has understood the satiating ability of certain combinations of proteins and fats for 50 years or so.

      Turns out human beings are made up of proteins and fats. Obviously the answer is to eat more complex carbohydrates, and abstain completely from animal fats.

      As for omega 3, saying fish have more of them is only true in modern times, when we feed soy and corn and phone books to our ruminants..

      ruminants used to mean that they ate grass… oh the good ol days..

    10. November 16, 2013 at 5:30 pm

      Good post! Medicine in our country is screwed right now…. My mother actually killed herself with meds prescribed by her doctor that say “may increase risk of suicide”…. Why would someone prescribe that?

      Actually – went to Peru not to long ago to work with a couple shamans…. Met people who had their cancer, diabetes, epilepsy, depression, addiction, and all sorts of other ills cured completely without any harmful side-effects, doctors, or meds – just plants and songs from shamans.

    11. neal
      November 17, 2013 at 9:24 pm

      Eat what sings, sing back, very simple. Probably not very noticed.
      You know, the bluejays in the central mountains of New Mexico hide cactus fruits, and pinons, into the ant hills, all year round. Those fermenting wombs give birth to various beetles, they sing back, and the jays get very high with the combination.

      Some times they even speak human sounds, that seems like fun. Now, the magpies, they pretty much imitate everything. River otters, they do this underwater. Now, the lizards, and the far northen parrots, they have their own thing going, even the Elk Nation and the Buffalo add this into the singing.

      Of course, some burn that into politics, but such is Life.

    12. Ian
      November 17, 2013 at 10:22 pm

      This is good stuff to keep at hand, thanks.

      Regarding the corruption of science, I have been quietly waiting for the scandal to break over the prevalence of bad science . Over a decade ago, I had a conversation with a medical ethicist who served on the Human Subjects Committee at a university that did a lot of medical research. He shared a story about a colleague who had come to him for personal advice regarding an awkward situation he found himself in. The colleague had just completed a study funded by a large corporate grant and upon completion received in the mail an article from the grantor summarizing his results.

      The problem? They weren’t his results–the article he received grossly exaggerated the efficacy of the medicine under examination. The researcher didn’t want to offend the sponsor because he was hoping to get more grant money from them. The ethicist suggested that the researcher act as if he had never received the article and publish his results normally. The colleague took his advice and all seemed to go well.

      Super uncomfortable, right? If the ‘ethical’ advice was to pretend corporate manipulations didn’t exist, how often do you think the ‘practical’ solution was simply to accept the corporate manipulation in the hopes of getting bigger bucks from them next time?
      Ian´s last blog post ..Sophia’s Story

    13. November 20, 2013 at 11:04 pm

      This is a really useful perspective, not least because Western culture, mind-body split, all Descartes’ fault, yada…

      By which I mean that:

      a) it’s easy to forget about the body because all the pixels and logograms are so shiny and crunchy

      and

      b) when we do remember to look after the body we can get caught up in a moralistic, self-denying, “oh-god-I-have-to-drag-this stupid-meatsuit-around-with-me-for-80+years” type mentality:

      Even when we intellectually know lots of good reasons to eat well, for example, including that our brains will function better, it can still feel like a horrible energy-sink where you spend all your willpower denying yourself ‘pleasure’ (if you don’t look at the experience of eating a whole packet of Leibniz chocolate biscuits too closely).

      Whereas, when we treat taking control of our health as part of The War, there is an emotional engagement and dynamic to the experience which makes choosing the right food, environment & practices a meaningful, energised and energising thing to do. “Haha, look at me, I’m eating a carrot, FUCK YOU, ARCHONS”.
      steelweaver´s last blog post ..Top environmental problems

    14. KK
      November 23, 2013 at 4:59 am

      “Whereas, when we treat taking control of our health as part of The War, there is an emotional engagement and dynamic to the experience which makes choosing the right food, environment & practices a meaningful, energised and energising thing to do. “Haha, look at me, I’m eating a carrot, FUCK YOU, ARCHONS”.

      YES.
      A million times….YES!
      Beautiful.

      Now off on a bit of a detour. I came across this verbatim on a wacky net forum. Don’t ask:

      “Don’t fear. Our bodies are designed to get rid of all the poisons in our food, and air. Just drink the purest water you find, and ask always for a removal of any harm on them (that is blessing your food, but ask mentally specifically for the removal of any thing put there by the controllers).

      Then what happens is that only those not asking will be affected. So it is dark ones killing dark ones. That is the Cleansing. Light people is protected. Never be afraid. ”

      This rsynched up with a bit of the supposed “Hopi elder prophecy”
      http://www.matrixmasters.com/takecharge/hopi-prophecy.html

      “Where are you living?
      What are you doing?
      What are your relationships?
      Are you in right relation?
      Where is your water?

      Know your garden.
      It is time to speak your truth.
      Create your community.
      Be good to each other.
      And do not look outside yourself for your leader.”

      In all this talk of health and food, don’t forget your water!

      Learn how to make seltzer water from pure water and add Milk Of Magnesia to it:
      http://www.afibbers.org/Wallerwater.pdf

      Or, drink natural sparkling mineral water.
      Critical for getting enough Magnesium into your body.

      Can also do Magnesium Chloride transdermal supplementation.
      I used Ancient Minerals bath flakes dissolved in water sprayed on and left on.
      Had some solid vivid/lucid dream action while doing that at night for some reason.
      Multiple times in a row. I’d like to see some other people try that and report what happens.

      Of course if you live near an ocean you can swim and get some Magnesium transdermally.

      Just some thoughts to ponder.

    15. Suddenly loud lurker
      December 6, 2013 at 2:53 am

      @KK- I am looking into your magnesium chloride theory and am seriously considering trying it.

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